ACM call for papers – Health Informatics Symposium

Association for Computing Machinery (ACM)
1st ACM International Health Informatics Symposium (IHI)
CALL FOR PAPERS

IHI 2010
November 11-12, 2010
Arlington, Virginia
http://ihi2010.sighi.org

SCOPE OF THE CONFERENCE

We cordially invite you to submit your contribution to the 2010 ACM International Health Informatics Symposium (IHI 2010).

IHI 2010 is ACM’s premier community forum concerned with the application of computer and information science principles as well as information and communication technology to problems in healthcare, public health, the delivery of healthcare services and consumer health informatics aspects, and finally, the related social and ethical issues on the use of computing technology in the health informatics domain.

IHI 2010 is primarily interested in serving as a venue for the discussion of innovative technical contributions highlighting end-to-end applications, systems, and technologies, even if available only in prototype form (where a system is not deployed in production mode and/or evaluation may be performed by giving examples). We strongly encourage authors to submit their original contributions describing their algorithmic contributions, methodological contributions, and well-founded conjectures providing whenever possible an application-oriented context. A paper does not have to be comprehensive and can focus on a single aspect.

Contributions in the realm of social and behavioral issues might include empirical studies of health-related information use and needs, socio-technical studies on the implementation and use of health information technology, studies on health informatics in the context of community impact and implications, studies on public policies on leveraging health informatics infrastructure, among others.

Specific topics of interest for this conference cover various facets of health informatics research, including but not limited to the following:
–    Accessibility and Web-enabled technologies
–    Analytics applied to direct and remote clinical care
–    Assistive and adaptive ubiquitous computing technologies
–    Bio-surveillance
–    Brain computer interface
–    Cleaning, preprocessing, and ensuring quality and integrity of medical records
–    Comparative effectiveness research
–    Computational support for patient-centered and evidence-based care
–    Consumer and clinician health information needs, seeking, sharing and use
–    Consumer health and wellness informatics applications
–    Continuous monitoring and streaming technologies
–    Data management, privacy, security, and confidentiality
–    Display and visualization of medical data
–    E-commerce in health informatics
–    E-communities and networks for patients and consumers
–    E-healthcare infrastructure design
–    E-learning for spreading health informatics awareness
–    Engineering of medical data
–    Evaluation of health information system
–    E-visit system
–    Experience of building health information system
–    Health informatics education
–    Health information system framework and enterprise architecture in the developing world
–    Health IT project management
–    Health software design
–    Health system simulation
–    High-performance computing in healthcare
–    Human-centered design of health informatics systems
–    Information retrieval for health applications
–    Information technologies for the management of patient safety and clinical outcomes
–    Innovative applications in electronic health records (e.g., ontology or semantic technology, using continuous biomedical signals to trigger alerts)
–    Intelligent medical devices and sensors
–    Issues involving interoperability and data representation in healthcare delivery
–    Keyword and multifaceted search over structured electronic health records
–    Knowledge discovery for improving patient-provider communication
–    Large-scale longitudinal mining of medical records
–    Medical compliance automation for patients and institutions
–    Medical recommender system (e.g., medical products, fitness programs)
–    Multimodal medical signal analysis
–    Natural language processing for biomedical literature, clinical notes, and health consumer texts
–    Novel health information systems for chronic disease management
–    Open-source software in healthcare
–    Optimization models for planning and recommending therapies
–    Personalized predictive modeling for clinical management (e.g., trauma, diabetes mellitus, sleep disorders, substance abuse)
–    Physiological modeling
–    Public health informatics
–    Quality assurance
–    Semantic Web, linked data, ontology, and healthcare
–    Sensor networks and systems for pervasive healthcare
–    Social studies of health information technologies
–    Survival analysis and related methods for estimating hazard functions
–    System software for complex clinical studies that involve combinations of clinical, genetic, genomic, imaging, and pathology data
–    Systems for cognitive and decision support
–    Technologies for capturing and documenting clinical encounter information in electronic systems
–    Telecare
–    Telemedicine
–    User-interface design issues applied to medical devices and systems

Each contribution will be carefully evaluated by a set of reviewers, including experts with multidisciplinary experience spanning computing, information science, social and behavioral sciences, public health, medicine, and nursing as appropriate, to ensure that proper and comprehensive peer-review analysis and feedback can be provided to authors. Submissions will be judged on validity, originality, technical strength, practical and clinical significance, quality of presentation, and relevance to the conference topics.

Because of IHI’s multidisciplinary nature, the review process will include at least a computing expert and a health expert as well as a review editor to reconcile the evaluation, making a single recommendation to the Program Committee Co-Chairs. This process is designed to ensure that experts from multiple areas can assess the importance and validity of the work. Therefore, we encourage submissions from a variety of fields where in-depth application-centric ideas addressing important problems in health informatics are discussed.

The conference will accept both regular and short papers. Regular papers (6-10 pages in length) will describe more mature ideas, where a substantial amount of implementation, experimentation, or data collection and analysis will be described. Short papers (1-5 pages) can be less formal and will describe innovative ideas where a lesser degree of validation and implementation have occurred. All papers will appear in the ACM Digital Library. The best papers of IHI 2010 will also be considered for journal publication in a special issue of Springer’s Journal of Medical Systems. Depending on the availability of time and space, not all papers will be given an oral presentation slot. Papers not selected for oral presentation will be available as posters. The conference organizers will work on ensuring that poster sessions are well attended and have a vibrant discussion environment.

Submitted papers must not have appeared in, or be under consideration for, another conference, workshop, journal, or other target of publication.

All aspects of the submission and notification process will be handled electronically. Submissions must adhere to the following formatting instructions:

”    Papers must adhere to the ACM Proceedings Format available for LaTex, WordPerfect, WordPerfect 9, and Word. Changing the template’s font size, margins, inter-column spacing, or line spacing is prohibited. Each paper must be submitted as a single PDF file, formatted for 8.5″ x 11″ paper.

”    The length of submission depends on the type of submission:
– Regular papers must be 6-10 pages long.
– Short papers may be at most 5 pages long.

”    Each paper must provide an appendix (which is excluded from the page limit) indicating the preferred review approach, including:
– The preferred allocation of reviewing expertise. This can be done by electing the primary and secondary focus of the paper (e.g., Computing, Information Science, Medicine, Nursing, and Social/Behavioral Science).
– A bulleted list with up to 3 topics covered in the paper (from the list of conference topics presented above)

IMPORTANT DATES

Abstract submission deadline: June 2, 2010 11:30pm EST
Paper submission deadline: June 4, 2010 11:30pm EST
Notification of acceptance: August 6, 2010 11:30pm EST
Camera-ready copy due: August 16, 2010 11:30pm EST

General Chair
Ümit Çatalyürek, Ohio State University (catalyurek.1 at osu dot edu)

Honorary General Chair
Gang Luo, IBM Research (luog at us dot ibm dot com)

Program Committee Co-Chairs
Henrique Andrade, IBM Research (hcma at us dot ibm dot com)
Neil R. Smalheiser, University of Illinois – Chicago (neils at uic dot edu)

Steering Committee Members
Dorin Comaniciu, Siemens Corporate Research
Michael D. Larsen, George Washington University
Ching-Yung Lin, IBM Research
Chunqiang Tang, IBM Research
YingLi Tian, City College of New York
Olivier Verscheure, IBM Research
Michael Weiner, Indiana University

Honorary Steering Committee members
Marion J. Ball, Johns Hopkins University & IBM Research
Joseph A. Konstan, University of Minnesota
Joel H. Saltz, Emory University

PROGRAM COMMITTEE MEMBERS
A Ishaq, SZABIST Dubai
Alec Holt, University of Otago
Amar Das, Stanford University
Ani Nahapetian, UCLA
Aryya Gangopadhyay, UMBC
Ashish Joshi, UMBC
Ashish Sharma, Emory University
Balakrishnan Prabhakaran, University of Texas at Dallas
Barbara Hayes, Indiana University School of Informatics
Barbara Wildemuth, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Chi-Ren Shyu, University of Missouri
Christopher Chute, Mayo Clinic
Chunqiang Tang, IBM Research
Courtney Corley, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory
Dan Morris, Microsoft Research
David Bader, Georgia Institute of Technology
Denise Anthony, Dartmouth College
Egondu Onyejekwe, Federal University of Technology Owerri
Egon L. van den Broek, Human-Centered Computing Consultancy, Vienna, Austria
Gregory Abowd, Georgia Tech
Guergana Savova, Harvard University
Hakan Ferhatosmanoglu, The Ohio State University
Hamid Ekbia, Indiana University
Hao Yang, Nokia Research
Hassan Ghasemzadeh, University of Texas at Dallas
H.Dominic Covvey, University of Waterloo
Honest Kimaro, University of Dar es Salaam
Huajun Chen, Zhejiang University
Javed Mostafa, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Jiahui Liu, Google Inc.
Jiming Liu, Hong Kong Baptist University
Jorge Ramirez, Apple Inc
Julie Jacko, University of Minnesota
Julie Kientz, University of Washington
Julie Maitland, National Research Council Canada
Julio Facelli, University of Utah
Jyotishman Pathak, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine
Kai Zheng, University of Michigan
Katarzyna Wac, Carnegie Mellon University
Katie Siek, University of Colorado at Boulder
Kay Connelly, Indiana University
Kelly Caine, Indiana University
Kevin Daimi, University of Detroit Mercy
Kiran Turaga, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute
Lei Zhang, IBM Research
Lena Mamykina, Columbia University Medical Center
Liangyou Chen, U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command
Lu Wang, Harvard-MIT
Luke (Jun) Huan, University of Kansas
Madhav Marathe,  Virginia Tech
Madhu C.Reddy, The Pennsylvania State University
Majid Sarrafzadeh, UCLA
Malika Mahoui, Indiana University Purdue University Indianapolis
Mathew Palakal, Indiana University Purdue University Indianapolis
Matt-Mouley Bouamrane, University of Glasgow
Meliha Yetisgen-Yildiz, University of Washington Medicine
Michael Larsen, George Washington University
Michelle Rogers, Drexel University
Minakshi Tikoo, University of Connecticut Health Center
Mohammad Mahoor, University of Denver
Noemie Elhadad, Columbia University
Olivier Verscheure, IBM Research
Patrick Widener, Emory University
Radhakrishnan Nagarajan, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences
Robert Patton, Oak Ridge National Laboratory
Roozbeh Jafari, University of Texas at Dallas
Samantha Adams, Erasmus University Rotterdam
Sanguthevar Rajasekaran, University of Connecticut
Selena Thomas, IBM Research
Shafaat Khan, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology
Sheba George, Charles Drew University of Medicine and Science
Soojin Park, University of Pennsylvania
Steven Demurjian, University of Connecticut
Suk-Chung Yoon, Widener University
Supten Sarbadhikari, PSG Institute of Medical Sciences and Research
Tahsin Kurc, Emory University
Ted Pedersen, University of Minnesota in Duluth
Thanos Vasilakos, University of Western Macedonia
Thomas Agresta, University of Connecticut Health Center
Thomas Finholt, University of Michigan
Thomas Karopka, IT Science Center Rügen gGmbH
Timothy Bickmore, Northeastern University
Tony Hu, Drexel University
Tyrone Grandison, IBM Research
Vagelis Hristidis, Florida International University
Vasant Honavar, Iowa State University
Vincent Tseng, National Cheng Kung University
William Kaiser, UCLA
William Lane, Brigham and Women’s Hospital
Xiaoxiao Chen, U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command
Xue-wen Chen, The University of Kansas
Yang Gong, University of Missouri
YingLi Tian, The City College of New York
Ying Tao, IBM Research
Yu Deng, IBM Research
Yunan Chen, University of California Irvine
Zhaohui Cai, AstraZeneca
Zeeshan Syed, University of Michigan
________________________________________________________________________________

CALL FOR DEMOS
1st ACM International Health Informatics Symposium (IHI 2010)

IHI 2010
November 11-12, 2010
Arlington, Virginia
http://ihi2010.sighi.org

SCOPE OF THE DEMO TRACK

We cordially invite you to submit your contribution to the demo track of the 2010 ACM International Health Informatics Symposium (IHI 2010).

The IHI demo track is an exciting and highly interactive way to demonstrate your health informatics system or application. Because of IHI’s focus on end-to-end systems, whereby applied informatics is used to address the needs of health and healthcare applications, demos of innovative systems are solicited, which illustrate practical research or engineering contributions in an interesting and interactive manner.

The demo program will be featured prominently in the conference program and should be seen as a vehicle for researchers, practitioners, and commercial/industrial/non-profit institutions to showcase innovative new technologies or applications in health informatics.

The demo review process will look for practical uses of technology and also for a “wow” factor in all submissions. We encourage the description of early prototypes as long as they clearly present a coherent, end-to-end view of what the application might become once it gets deployed in production.

A submission proposal includes a demo paper and can optionally include a demo video, whose URL should be referred to in the textual demo description for reviewers to take into consideration when analyzing the submission. Note that the demo paper should differ from regular papers in several important aspects. First, it should clearly describe the overall architecture of the system or technology demonstrated. Second, the paper should put great emphasis on the motivation of the work, on the applications of the presented system or technology, and on the novelty of the work. Third, the proposal should clearly describe the demo scenario. In particular, it should describe how the demo audience can interact with the demo system, in order to obtain understanding of the underlying technology. For demos running over the web, a back-up scenario should be described, in case of low connectivity at the demo venue.

All topics described in the Call for Papers are eligible for demo track submissions.

WHAT SHOULD BE SUBMITTED

All aspects of the submission and notification process will be handled electronically. Submissions must adhere to the following guidelines:

”    The author(s) name and affiliation(s) must be present in the submitted document. Any submitted demo proposal violating the length, file type, or formatting requirements will be rejected without review.
”    Papers must adhere to the ACM Proceedings Format available for LaTex, WordPerfect, WordPerfect 9, and Word. Changing the template’s font size, margins, inter-column spacing, or line spacing is prohibited. Each paper must be submitted as a single PDF file, formatted for 8.5″ x 11″ paper.
”    The length of submission is 4 pages. This page limit includes all parts of the proposal: title, abstract, body, and bibliography.
”    Each paper must provide an appendix (which is excluded from the page limit) indicating the preferred review approach, including:
– The preferred allocation of reviewing expertise. This can be done by electing the primary and secondary focus of the paper (e.g., Computing, Information Science, Medicine, Nursing, and Social/Behavioral Science).
– A bulleted list with up to 3 topics covered in the paper (from the list of conference topics)

The optional demo video should focus on illustrating the demo scenario and the interactive nature of the demo system. The video must be no more than three minutes in length and should start by clearly identifying the authors and title of the proposal. The video should be in common video format (e.g., MPEG, AVI), and should be playable on a wide variety of media players. We strongly encourage authors to produce and submit a demo video and such video will be linked off of the final program on the conference website.

The notification for acceptance of demo papers is the same as that for regular papers. Accepted demo proposals will appear in the final proceedings and in ACM digital library. Note that all deadlines are the same as for regular paper submissions.

IMPORTANT DATES

Demo paper submission deadline: June 4, 2010 11:30pm EST
Notification of acceptance: August 6, 2010 11:30pm EST
Camera-ready copy due: August 16, 2010 11:30pm EST

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